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Train Your Dog to Find Sheds
By Irby C. Edwards III

Train Your Dog to Find Sheds

Now that I have trained my young Labrador Retriever to find sheds, I look forward to my time in the woods at the end of deer season.

Remi's nose comes in handy here in Georgia where ground cover is thick. Sheds are much harder to find in the forests of the Deep South, unlike the giant fields and open ground in the Midwest.

It was easier to train Remi than I thought it would be. It only took him a couple of days to grasp the concept of retrieving sheds.

Here are the steps I used to train my dog:

First, I used a fresh, natural-smelling shed to get Remi interested in playing fetch. Once he showed excitement, I rewarded him with a small dog treat after each retrieval.

From the yard, I progressed to throwing it into the bushes for Remi to find. When he got good at that, we tried it in the woods.

As he searched for hidden sheds, I used the phrases "Hunt it up, Remi!" and "Shed . . . Remi . . . find shed!"

Once he mastered finding the single shed, I scattered my entire stash of sheds across the yard until he got the idea that sheds come in multiples.

After he figured that out, we moved deep into the woods where I made it increasingly difficult for Remi to locate the hidden antlers. Not only did he master shed hunting quickly, I even taught him to put the shed in the bag!

If we don't find sheds, it's still a great way to spend a post-season day in the woods with a good friend.


Salvaging Torn Gear
Over the years, I have thrown away countless backpacks, pants, shirts, bibs and other gear when they got a rip or tear because they would only stay fixed a short time. Trying to mend them seems to be a big waste time
 

Push into Public Land
Like many hunters who don’t have access to private lands or who don’t want to pay an arm and a leg to lease property, I like to hunt on public land. But, not surprisingly, so do a lot of other hunters.
 

No Knife Sharpener, No Problem!
Whether you are filleting fish or field dressing a deer, there are times you need to touch up the edge of a knife in the field but there simply isn't a sharpener on hand.
 

Appear, Deer!
Have you ever scrolled through your trail cam photos and not paid much attention to the really dark ones that appear to have nothing in them? This can be a huge mistake!
 

Never Assume!
This classic mistake has happened to me more times than I'd like to admit, and I bet it's happened to you, too. After sitting in the stand for several hours without seeing so much as a squirrel or bird, I would stand up to stretch or grab a snack ou...
 

Compass Usage for Treestand Setups
Experienced hunters use a compass for more than just map reading. To make my treestands most effective during hunting season, I always carry a compass.
 

Linger for the Lens!
For those of you who use trail cameras like I do, I think you'll find this tip very useful! I've noticed deer will stay longer in front of my camera if I take a moment to broadcast the corn and other attractants instead of just dumping it in a big pi...
 

Treestand Treats!
Years ago while hunting in Mexico, I picked up one of the simplest, most useful hunting tips I've ever received. Take a handful of hard candy with you before heading to your stand, and keep it in your pocket within easy reach.
 

Feather & Floss Wind Indicator
Bird hunters, save the downy feathers from your pheasants, doves, quail and grouse for a foolproof feather wind indicator. I like to attach a feather to an 8 to 12 inch length of dental floss, then tie the other end to my gun barrel and let the feat...
 

Approach Animals from Behind!
My father always taught me that a deer's behavior is often deceptive, especially if it is injured or wounded. Deer will sometimes play possum, as they do instinctively as a fawn, allowing danger to pass by.
 
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