Critter Tales

Hmmmmmm ... Listen for the cicadas

Hmmmmmm ... Listen for the cicadas

By Buckmasters Online

Photo: Red-eyed, black-bodied periodical cicadas emerge in large broods every 13 to 17 years, depending on the specific brood and location. If you missed the huge emergence of 13-year cicadas in 2011 because they were not present in the area where you live, you may have another opportunity this year. Two other broods of periodical cicadas will emer... READ MORE

Now you can track a golden eagle

Now you can track a golden eagle

By Buckmasters Online

Photo: Watch movements of the golden eagle captured in Kentucky on the Bernheim Forest website.  – Photo Courtesy Billy Pope, Alabama Department Conservation and Natural Resources Researchers recently captured a golden eagle in Kentucky’s Bernheim Forest in Bullitt and Nelson Counties and fitted it with a tracking device as part of... READ MORE

Tundra Swans Soaring North

Tundra Swans Soaring North

By Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

If you live near an east or west coastline in the United States, the Mississippi River or any of the five Great Lakes, Utah’s Great Salt Lake or nearby marshland adjacent to these large bodies of water, you’ll know spring is near when great flocks of waterfowl begin their return to the Arctic tundra. Among them is the Tundra Swan, Cygn... READ MORE

Returning a favor

Returning a favor

By Nebraska Game and Parks

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Nebraska reintroduced wild turkeys from other states to its landscape after the big birds had been extirpated decades earlier during the nation’s westward expansion. The reintroduction was so successful that turkeys have again become common border-to-border, and Nebraska is now able to help another state. Th... READ MORE

Crane or Heron?

Crane or Heron?

By Brandon Howell

“That blasted crane is fishing in my pond again,” I heard my father say. I have corrected him many times, but he still refers to the great blue heron as some kind of crane. Many wildlife viewers do not realize that herons and cranes are different species of birds. Most pond owners just want the birds out of their ponds and off their pro... READ MORE

Spotlighting Arizona’s black-footed ferrets

Spotlighting Arizona’s black-footed ferrets

By Arizona Game & Fish Dept.

During October, workers and volunteers with the Arizona Game and Fish Department will be looking for—and counting—an elusive nocturnal carnivore, the black-footed ferret. Because the ferret is almost strictly nocturnal, the means to document them, called spotlighting, will be done during evening hours. As part of the black-footed ferret... READ MORE

Copyright 2017 by Buckmasters, Ltd.

Copyright 2017 by Buckmasters, Ltd