Tips & Tactics

Don’t Call Like a Celebrity

Don’t Call Like a Celebrity

By Ken Piper

As fun as it is to watch on TV hunting shows, mashing antlers together like thunder and playing a grunt call like a flute are not the best tactics for most hunters after a trophy buck. The reason it works so well on TV is the hunters are usually on private land with well-managed deer herds, lower hunting pressure and better buck-to-doe ratios. In t... READ MORE

Warmers in Extreme Cold

Warmers in Extreme Cold

By William Sharp

My tip is a follow up to a 2013 Buckmasters Tip of the Week submitted by bowhunter Stacy Vaccaro. Stacy explained how she uses disposable hand and toe warmers on her arms and shoulders to keep her muscles loose enough to draw her bow in the extreme cold of Wisconsin. Buckmasters Tip Editor Tim H. Martin added how he learned to put hand and toe wa... READ MORE

Wooden Ladder Love

Wooden Ladder Love

By John F. Bruce

My tip expounds on an earlier Tip of the Week about treestand care — specifically, what happens to wooden ladder stands after the tree grows and sways in wind and rain for a year. Between tree growth and weather, nails and screws holding together wooden ladder stands are especially susceptible to becoming loose or growing into the tree. Look ... READ MORE

Evergreen Rubdown

Evergreen Rubdown

By Wesley J. Cagle

One of my personal favorite tips is something I’ve done for a long time, and it really works for tricking a deer’s nose. I’m almost never winded, and have had countless deer walk within feet of me. It’s become a routine now. All I do is take fresh pine needles — preferably from a young tree — and break them ever... READ MORE

Blades Up!

Blades Up!

By Tim H. Martin

I learned a lot about skinning animals from hanging with world-class taxidermists most of my life. Several of my best friends are award-winning “taxis” who have created mounts any sportsman would drool over. In 1974, when I was 11 years old, my best friend’s father, Dan Rhymer, was a taxidermist for The Smithsonian Institution. On... READ MORE

Take Great Field Photos: Part One

Take Great Field Photos: Part One

By Tim H. Martin and Mike Handley

Field photos, also known as grip-and-grins, are photos of hunters posing with their freshly killed animals, usually taken by a friend or relative of the hunter. As Art Director of Rack Magazine, each year, I receive hundreds of field photos. Sadly and all-too-often, the images are unusable, even of world-class bucks. You’d be shocked how many... READ MORE

Easy Tick Removal Tool

Easy Tick Removal Tool

By Tim H. Martin | Buckmasters Tip Editor

I hate ticks probably more than any creature on earth. As a lifelong outdoorsman, I have tweezed, nail-polished, burned, smothered and popped more of these horrid creatures than I can count. Why in the world God invented ticks in the first place is a mystery to me. During turkey season last year, I reached down in the middle of the night and felt ... READ MORE

Wild Game Buttermilk Bath

Wild Game Buttermilk Bath

By Rod Robert

Venison isn’t the only meat that sometimes has a gamey flavor, and that seems to be a recurring theme among people who eat wild game. For example, where I’m from, we have sharp-tailed grouse. They are practically inedible unless you do something to help them out. I have a simple trick that helps improve my wild game cooking, and it work... READ MORE

Don’t Overlook Eye Safety

Don’t Overlook Eye Safety

By Bob Henry

We all want to be safe when we’re out there hunting and return home without any injuries. After a recent accident, I wanted to share a safety tip with Buckmasters members and everyone who hunts. Hopefully, my story will prevent them from going through the same awful experience I just went through. Earlier this season, when I got down from my... READ MORE

Hang Your Ladder Stands Safely

Hang Your Ladder Stands Safely

By Hunter Safety System

Hanging treestands is one of the more difficult and dangerous tasks hunters face — even ladder stands. Our friends at Hunter Safety System created a short video entitled "How to Hang a Ladder Stand Safely" that will help put your mind at ease and make the job easier. It features tips for installing what we at Buckmasters consider to be the mo... READ MORE

Aim According To Your Weapon

Aim According To Your Weapon

By Ken Piper

All hunters want to make the quickest, cleanest harvest possible, and that’s why we spend so much time practicing and studying deer anatomy. While learning more about deer is great, there are more things to consider than the location of a buck’s vitals. In short, optimum shot placement changes with the weapon being used. Broadhead-tippe... READ MORE

Second Chance Deer Mounts

Second Chance Deer Mounts

By Dale Rehm

Mounting a deer can be pretty expensive these days, and sometimes we shoot a buck that’s decent, but doesn’t quite have what it takes to spend the money for a taxidermy bill. So, what do we do? Nearly always, we boil the skull, or maybe spend a little money to have a European mount done by our taxidermist instead of a full shoulder moun... READ MORE

Failing Food Plots?

Failing Food Plots?

By ACES at Auburn University

You might have noticed that some or all of your plots are not producing like they used to or that they seem to be prone to failure in the summer months. One factor that you might not have considered is hardpan. Hardpan is a layer of soil that has become dense and compacted by heavy equipment, found from 2 to 10 inches below the topsoil. Hardpan ... READ MORE

Diamond-Dusted Honing for Hunters

Diamond-Dusted Honing for Hunters

By Rick Roesler

Seems like hunters always need to sharpen something. I have found inexpensive, easily packable items that really do the trick, even in the field. There are several types of files embedded with diamond dust or diamond grit that will put an edge on your gear. The flat kind women use to file their nails are very inexpensive, and you can find them at T... READ MORE

Old Timer's Bag o' Tricks

Old Timer's Bag o' Tricks

By Richard Brubaker

If you are like me, you enjoy saving and eating the heart and liver from your deer. The problem is getting these tasty parts out of the woods without losing them or making a mess. Sure, you can put them in a plastic bag or game pouch, but then you have to transport the bloody pouch in your hands, pocket or backpack while you drag. Here's an old tim... READ MORE

Copyright 2020 by Buckmasters, Ltd.

Copyright 2020 by Buckmasters, Ltd