GunHunter

Finding the Sweet Spot

Finding the Sweet Spot

By Ron Spomer

The right bullet at the right seating depth can shoot like a house afire. Pardon the personal question, but how deep is your seat? This has nothing to do with furniture or your personal deep-seated convictions. It has everything to do with how accurately your rifles shoot. Bullet seating depth is critical. You probably already know that a particula... READ MORE

Those Sweet Single Shots

Those Sweet Single Shots

By Ron Spomer

One-shooters don’t have obvious advantages over repeaters, but there are some. In this age of sub-MOA autoloading AR rifles, why would anyone bother with a single shot? Single shots are not for firepower, efficiency or enhanced productivity. Single shots are for joy. For romance. Challenge. Sometimes, beauty and elegance. A single shot is to ... READ MORE

Don’t Skimp on Scope Mounts

Don’t Skimp on Scope Mounts

By Richard Mann

“Just any old rings and bases” can be the wrong choice and the weak link that fails at the most inopportune time. There you stand, rifle in one hand and a riflescope in the other. Since duct tape and baling twine are not options, how shall you bring them together? Sifting through the myriad riflescope rings and bases on the market see... READ MORE

Savage Model 25 Lightweight Varmint Rifle

Savage Model 25 Lightweight Varmint Rifle

By Clair Rees

A varminter needn’t be cumbersome to be accurate. One of the most interesting new rifles I’ve seen in recent months is the Model 25 Lightweight Varminter from Savage. It’s a startling departure from the 110 series of rifles the company has produced for more than a half-century. Highly successful because of its accuracy and low cos... READ MORE

Return of the Bolt-Action Slug Gun

Return of the Bolt-Action Slug Gun

By Dave Henderson

Turnbolt shotguns are the hottest tickets in slug gun shooting today. Photo: Savage bolt actions have a reputation for outstanding accuracy. Among deer hunters in the shotguns-only environs of rural New York a half-century ago, it was common knowledge that Ithaca Gun and Remington Arms made shotguns, and every other company just tried real hard. Th... READ MORE

Lever-Action Tuneup

Lever-Action Tuneup

By Richard Mann

Easy enhancements for an iconic rifle. With all the new bolt-action and AR-style rifles on the market, you might think hunters have forgotten about lever guns. The lever-action rifle is an iconic American firearm. Thousands of hunters still use them. In some situations, the lever gun can be the best option. Following are some enhancements that can ... READ MORE

Five Guns Worth Finding

Five Guns Worth Finding

By Jon R. Sundra

These  hunting guns are no longer made, but are well worth seeking on the used gun market. Photo: Top: Winchester Model 9422. Center: Remington Nylon 66. The Nylon 66’s unique construction and looks were far ahead of its time. It remains the best-selling rimfire rifle in the history of Remington Arms.  Bottom: Remington Model 788. O... READ MORE

.35s That Survived

.35s That Survived

By Russell Thornberry

The .35 Whelen, .35 Remington and .350 Rem Mag are the ultimate woods calibers. There were numerous .35-caliber rifle cartridges born in the 20th century, but most of them didn’t live to see the dawning of the 21st century. Surviving .35-caliber cartridges introduced as factory offerings include the .35 Remington (1906); .356 Winchester (1980... READ MORE

CZ’s Little Mauser

CZ’s Little Mauser

By Jon R. Sundra

The M1 American is the most attractive rifle in CZ's 527 line of bolt-action sporters. One of the most respected firearms manufacturers in the world is Ceska Zbrojovka, which explains why the company goes by the simple acronym CZ. Based in the town of Uhersky Brod in the Czech Republic, the company’s 200 acres of buildings make it the larges... READ MORE

America’s Most Popular OU

America’s Most Popular OU

By Nick Sisley

A very high-quality shotgun for the price, the Browning Citori holds up to extensive shooting. The Browning Citori over-and-under shotgun and its predecessor, the Superposed, are forever linked. Without the Superposed, the Citori would never have been born. The Superposed was on the drawing board for several years before it was introduced in 1931. ... READ MORE

The Traditional Way

The Traditional Way

By John Haviland

Hunting with a caplock or flinter connects us with our ancestors and a simpler time. Some shooters claim the last improvements to muzzleloading rifles came in the early ’60s — the 1860s, that is. These traditionalists prefer shooting a pure lead projectile, a rifle that belches a cloud of smoke and requires almost a minute to reload. Ca... READ MORE

10 Steps to a Tack Driver

10 Steps to a Tack Driver

By Ron Spomer

Turning a so-so shooter into a MOA rifle might be easier than you think. So you finally bought that rifle you’ve been lusting after all these years. Or maybe you inherited one from your uncle. But it’s not living up to your daydreams, not exactly shooting lights out. Well then, tweak it. More precisely, accurize it. Webster’s does... READ MORE

Best Scopes for the Buck

Best Scopes for the Buck

By Ron Spomer

Shop carefully, and you can find an inexpensive scope that hangs with you year in and year out. When you raise your rifle at sunset and the scope shows a bright orange haze instead of the buck standing at the edge of the timber, the answer to the question “Did I spend enough on my scope?” is no. The orange haze incident actually happene... READ MORE

Remington’s Classic Rimfire

Remington’s Classic Rimfire

By Clair Rees

After 54 years of service, the Model 552 Speedmaster is still one of the sleekest .22 autoloaders available. I fell in love with the Remington Model 552 Speedmaster .22 the first time I saw it in the Sears and Roebuck window. That was in 1957, when the gun was first introduced and Sears and Roebuck still sold firearms. One of its features was a big... READ MORE

The Knockdown Power Myth

The Knockdown Power Myth

By Ron Spomer

Bullet placement is far more important in the field than bullet theory. Photo: Although black bears are usually not as large as grizzlies, they can be just as dangerous, so it’s best to knock them down. The author prefers a deep-penetrating bullet that will exit, leaving two holes for trailing. There’s an old joke about the hunter who k... READ MORE

Copyright 2020 by Buckmasters, Ltd.

Copyright 2020 by Buckmasters, Ltd