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Why are you seeing so many deer now?

Back ToYBO Home PageIn the fall, people start noticing increased deer sightings. Drivers are on alert, and it's not unusual to hear about someone hitting a deer with a vehicle.

So why are you seeing so many deer this time of year? It's because of a number of reasons, including:

* Mating Season: Deer mating season occurs between October and early December. Male deer go into rut and begin actively searching for mates. This greatly contributes to the increased movement of deer, bringing them across roadways.

Photo Courtesy of Chris Brown* Increased human population and rural development: As the human population continues to grow and expand into traditionally rural areas, deer lose their natural food source and consequently move into new areas in search of food and water.

* Time Changes: As we change our clocks from Daylight Savings Time, our days become shorter and nights become longer. Rush hour for most commuters tends to fall during the same hours in which white-tailed deer are most active: at dawn and dusk.

Departments of Natural Resources across the country offer motorists tips and information to help avoid potential collisions.

Remember these key things about deer:

* Unpredictable:  Always remember deer are wildlife and therefore, can be unpredictable. A deer calmly standing on the side of a road may bolt into or across the road rather than away from it when startled by a vehicle.

* One Deer Usually Means More:  Take caution and slow down when a deer crosses. Deer generally travel in groups, so if one crosses, be prepared that others may follow.

* Time of Day:  Because deer are most active at dawn and dusk, they typically are seen roadside during the early morning and late evening: the same times most people are commuting to and from work or school.

* Time of Year:  While deer-car collisions can occur any time of year, the fall breeding season is a peak time for such accidents. Road shoulders generally provide green food both during extremely dry times of the year and following a long, hard winter.

* Minimize Damage: If it is too late to avoid a collision, drivers are advised to slow down as much as possible to minimize damage: resist the urge to swerve to avoid the deer, this may cause further damage, sending drivers off the road or causing a collision with another vehicle. If an accident occurs, alert the police as soon as possible.

For more information on white-tailed deer or deer seasons, visit our Hunting Information By State page at  http://www.buckmasters.com/top-stories/state-dnrs.aspx.

Source:  the Georgia Department of Natural Resources

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