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Watching Eagles

Photo from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Compiled from Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Reports

This spring, people interested in American Bald Eagles are seeing an interesting, true to nature life lesson as a pair of nesting bald eagles are being observed on an eagle cam.

The video camera watching the nesting pair went live Feb. 5. It was installed above the nest late last year with help from an Xcel Energy crew using a boom truck and Floyd Security. Located in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan region, the eagle nest contained three eggs that were expected to hatch early to mid-February.

Back ToYBO Home PageBut that didn’t happen. The average incubation time for American Bald Eagles is 35 days. Unfortunately, the weather got very cold; the temperature fell below zero several times during those 35 days. It became apparent the eggs will not hatch, and biologists believe the final egg will likely break apart like the first two did.

This pair of eagles might try again to lay eggs this year, or another pair might come along and use the nest. However, based on the previous three-year history of this nest, these and/or other birds will hang around all year and will continue to allow us a view into their majestic, mysterious and fascinating world.

The exact location of the next will not be disclosed to protect the eagles from crowds gathering.  However, visitors can watch the nest, 24 hours a day by viewing the live feed at  www.eaglecam.dnr.state.mn.us.

Photo from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources“Unlike a lot of major metropolitan areas, the Twin Cities still has some pretty spectacular natural areas where wildlife such as eagles can flourish,” said Keith Parker, the DNR Central Region director. “We’re hoping people will get excited by watching this eagle family.”

The eagle camera was paid for by Nongame Wildlife program, which is largely funded by donations made by Minnesotans who check off the program on their state income and property tax forms.

Minnesota has more American Bald Eagles than any other state in the lower 48 states.

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