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Sit Down Practice

Tip of the Week
Do you practice shooting your bow from a seated position? Most bowhunters don't, and most bowhunters will get caught flat-footed, or maybe we should say flat-bottomed, at some time during the season. How a 200-plus pound whitetail can appear in bow range out of nowhere is one of the worlds big mysteries, but chances are you are going to be faced with having to take a seated shot.

Next time you're practicing, take a small stool and make several rounds of shots while sitting. Even better, if you can hook up the seat section of your tree stand and shoot seated from that, even if just a foot or two off the ground, do it. This little bit of practice will make all the difference in the world, especially for an early season hunt. Preparation and practice will help you increase your chances of harvesting that big buck this season.
 

Range finding made easy

Reader Tip of the Week: "Range finding made easy"
"Prior to the archery season,(5 weeks or so) my wife and I like to put one of us in a stand and the other on the ground. Not only do we check shooting lanes and possible approach routes on a likely suspect, but the person in the stand takes a range finder up with them and " shoots" some of the trees or brush on the ground. The ground person then affixes a small piece of trail tape to the trees in a half circle in the front of the stand.

1 ribbon for 5 yards, 2 ribbons for 10 yards 3 for 15 and so on. You can use clothespins or any other visible marker that works for you. What this does come opening day allows you to leave the rangefinder at home, instead of fumbling around guessing on a good place to take your shot. As a deer passes in front, behind or even in between two markers you can very accurately judge the distance to select a pin and let her fly. The deer don't notice the markers at all. I have watched them stand next to them and even give one a sniff or so.

Try this method for a less anxious time prior to the shot and you'll be surprised how much this will ease the worry of determining distance on a shooter buck. -- Mike

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