Register  | Login
  Search
TOP STORIES
Feature

Current Articles | Search | Syndication


Seed Species Profile

Back To Land Management Home PageCOOL SEASON

Austrian Winter Peas
Type: Cool season annual legume
Uses: Austrian winter peas will make a great food plot or addition to a mixture planted in the fall to attract deer. Highly favored by whitetails, these fast growing peas will attract deer to a plot soon after germination, making them a preferred choice for bow hunters.
Planting Information:
Date: September-November
Rate: 50 pounds/acre or 1 1/4 pounds/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Birdsfoot Trefoil
Type: Perennial legume
Uses: Birdsfoot Trefoil will make great forage for deer, turkey and other wildlife in harsh conditions. It is very tolerant of poorly drained, lowland or acidic soils. It is drought resistant and salt tolerant but not adapted to the Deep South. Trefoil is very slow to establish, but once established it is persistent and resistant to browsing.
Planting Information:
Date: August-October and February-April
Rate: 10 pounds/acre or 1/4 pound/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1/4"

Sweet Blue Lupine
Type: Cool season annual legume
Uses: Blue Lupine has become a favored planting by many wildlife enthusiasts wanting to attract deer, turkey, quail and other game. It produces excellent high quality deer feed in the fall and spring months. Lupine produces a beautiful blue spike-like bloom and also makes excellent seed production for game birds.
Planting:
Date: North: April-May
          South: September-October and March-April
Rate: 100 pounds/acre or 2 1/2 pounds/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1" maximum

Arrowleaf Clover
Type: Cool season reseeding annual legume
Uses: Arrowleaf clover is a very high yielding and high quality reseeding clover. The hollow stemmed plants have large blooms that are pink, white and purple in color. It is late maturing and will usually be productive into late July. It will tolerate low pH and sandy soils. This heavy reseeder makes a great plot for deer and turkey.
Planting Information:
Date: September-October
Rate: 8 pounds/acre or 3 ounces/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4" maximum

Alfalfa
Type: Cool season perennial legume
Uses: Alfalfa makes an excellent quality forage for deer, turkey and rabbits. High in protein and with tremendous yields on good, well-drained soil, Alfalfa provides nutrition during fall, spring and summer.
Planting Information:
Date: September-October and March-May
Rate: 20 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/8" maximum

Crimson Clover
Type: Cool season reseeding annual legume
Uses: Crimson clover, by far, is the most widely used annual clover for feeding and attracting deer, turkey, rabbits and other game species to food plot areas. It is a widely adapted plant that tolerates different soil types and low pH soils. It is an excellent and dependable re-seeding clover that is early maturing. Crimson works well in mixtures with small grains or later maturing clover such as white and red.
Planting Information:
Date: September-October
Rate: 20 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1/4"

Hairy Vetch
Type: Cool season reseeding annual legume
Uses: Hairy vetch makes an excellent addition to fall planted deer mixtures. Its spring forage production is very palatable to deer and turkeys and it makes an excellent seed crop for quail and turkey.
Planting Information:
Date: September-October
Rate: 20 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1/2" maximum

Red Clover
Type: Cool season perennial legume
Uses: Red clover is a winter-hardy legume that is excellent for deer and turkey food plots. It is a highly productive, late maturing clover growing from 18 to 30 inches tall during early to mid summer. It is very high yielding but usually only lasts about two years before needing to be replanted.
Planting Information:
Date: September-October and February-April
Rate: 15 pounds/acre or 6 ounces/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1/4" maximum

Subterranean Clover
Type: Cool season annual legume
Uses: Subterranean clover is a very low growing, shade-tolerant clover that will tolerate acidic soil conditions.
Planting Information:
Date: September-October
Rate: 20 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1/4"

White Ladino Clover
Type: Cool season perennial legume
Uses: Ladino clovers grow best when planted with small grains such as wheat, oats or rye. They can be overgrazed by deer in the young seedling stage and the grains can help take the early grazing pressure off the clover. Ladino clovers are very high yielding and high quality providing excellent protein for fall, spring and early summer. Ladino clover will generally last for 3 to 5 years as a perennial. Ladino clover makes an excellent food plot for deer and turkey as well as produce insects for quail chicks and turkey poults. Use on clay or loam soils or bottom land for best results.
Planting Information:
Date: North: August 15-October 1
                    Frost seeding: January-February, March-May
         South: September-December
Rate: 8 pounds/acre or 3 ounces/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4" maximum

Wintergrazer 70 Rye
Type: Cool season annual grain
Uses: Wintergrazer is well adapted throughout many parts of the U.S. It is excellent in combination with clover as a nurse crop because of its early maturity and ability to maintain its upright growth. It does not mat down and smother the clover that is getting established underneath it. It can reach a height of 4 to 5 feet tall and is very fast to establish, producing deer feed in as little as 14 days in ideal conditions. Wintergrazer rye grain is preferred by deer and is the most cold tolerant of all the cereal grains. Wintergrazer 70 is a rye grain and should not be confused with ryegrass.
Planting Information:
Date: September-November
Rate: 100 pounds/acre or 2 1/2 pounds/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

WARM SEASON

Aeschynomene
Type: Warm season reseeding annual legume
Uses: Aeschynomene is also known as deer vetch or American joint vetch. Joint vetch is best suited for moist, fertile soils as it is much more tolerant of wet conditions than drought. It is known to have moderate shade tolerance. The plants can reach 3 to 5 feet tall when mature and are very high in protein and quality for deer. Aeschynomene's attractiveness will persist into the fall months until first frost, making it a favorite of bow hunters.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 20 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4"

Alyce Clover
Type: Warm season annual legume
Uses: Alyce is a warm season tropical clover that grows upright to heights of 12 to 24 inches with pink flowers when it blooms in late summer or early fall.  It is high in protein and high yielding through the hot summer. It is heat and drought tolerant and a favorite forage of deer and turkey. Alyce can be slow to establish so using it in mixtures of sorghum, buckwheat or joint vetch works well.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 20 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4" maximum

Benne or Sesame
Type: Warm season annual forb
Uses: Benne is a tall growing annual forb that will achieve 4 to 6 feet in height at maturity. After the seed pods bloom the pods will scatter oily seeds in great quantity for all game birds, especially quail and doves. Seed production will occur in about 90 days after emergence.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 6 pounds/acre or 2 ounces/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4"

Bicolor Lespedeza
Type: Warm season perennial shrub
Uses: Bicolor lespedeza is a perennial shrub that can grow from 6 to 10 feet high. As a legume, it supplies its own nitrogen. The abundant seed produced is attractive to quail and other game birds and can remain in the soil for long periods without rotting because of its hardseed coat. The shrub makes an excellent food and cover for birds. Many landowners use it for a border or in hedge rows for funneling animals through corridors or creating dense screens so motorists cannot see into fields from the road.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 15 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2" maximum

Black Sunflower (Peredovik Type)
Type: Warm season annual
Uses: Black sunflower can grow from 2 to 4 feet high forming small heads full of black seed high in oil content. The seed makes excellent feed for all game birds, especially doves. The plants are highly preferred by deer when they are young and still growing. It takes about 110 days for seed to mature from germination.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 40 pounds/acre or 1 pound/1,000 sq.ft. or 8-10 pounds/acre in a row
Depth: 1/2"

Browntop Millet
Type: Warm season annual grass
Uses: Browntop is a leafy annual grass that grows from 2-3 feet tall producing heavy seed yields in about 50-60 days after emergence. It is a great plant for quail and doves on upland soils and ducks on flooded lands.
Planting Information:
Date: April-August
Rate: 40 pounds/acre or 1 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2" maximum

Buckwheat
Type: Warm season annual
Uses: Buckwheat is extremely early maturing with seed yields as fast as 10-12 weeks after emergence. Well suited to almost any soil type, the plant is attractive to deer as an excellent summer forage. The plant will make clusters of small white flowers forming triangular shaped black seeds. Afterwards, the seed is reluctant to shatter, thus remaining on the stalk for long periods providing feed for turkey and other game birds throughout the summer months.
Planting Information:
Date: April-July
Rate: 50 pounds/acre or 1 1/4 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Chufas
Type: Warm season annual sedge
Uses: This annual nutsedge will mature in about 100 days, producing underground nuts or tubers that turkey, deer, ducks and hogs cannot resist. Chufa will make an excellent plot by itself or mixes well with other plants. Turkey will visit chufa fields time and time again searching for buried tubers.
Planting Information:
Date: April-May
Rate: 50 pounds/acre or 1 1/4 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1"-2"

Dove Proso Millet
Type: Warm season annual grass
Uses: These plants can reach 4 to 6 feet tall producing an open seed head similar to oats. A unique characteristic is the seed will not mature uniformly. They will start to ripen from the top of the head down, dislodging and dropping to the ground as they mature. The seeds are very shiny, slick and resist mold and mildew making them an excellent plant for doves, quail and ducks. The seed will mature in about 75 to 100 days after emergence.
Planting Information:
Date: April-July
Rate: 40 pounds/acre or 1 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2" maximum

Egyptian Wheat
Type: Warm season annual grass
Uses: Egyptian wheat is a tall growing, up to 10 feet, member of the sorghum family that is well adapted to the Southeast. It bears loose seed heads with abundant seed well suited for game birds, especially quail. Seed will mature approximately 110 days after emergence. Egyptian wheat also makes excellent cover for quail.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 10 pounds/acre or 1/4 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Iron and Clay Peas
Type: Warm season annual legume
Uses: Iron and clay cowpeas are perhaps the most popular peas for wildlife enthusiasts planting warm season plots for deer. It is extremely high yielding, high in protein and productive throughout the summer. It is very tolerant to deer pressure once established and has good regrowth potential. It will also produce seed in pods in late summer that make excellent quail and turkey food.
Planting Information:
Date: April-August
Rate: 60 pounds/acre or 1 1/2 pounds/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"-1"

Japanese Millet
Type: Warm season annual grass
Uses: Japanese millet is also known as Jap or Duck millet. It is an annual that grows 2 to 4 feet tall. It will tolerate wet and muddy soil conditions while growing and can even be slightly flooded while growing as long as the leaves remain above water. The seed will mature on the stalk in 45-60 days. The plant can be flooded after maturity for duck ponds.
Planting Information:
Date: June-July
Rate: 40 pounds/acre or 1 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4"
Method: Drain a beaver pond to expose wet mud flats. Install a water control structure such as a 3-log drain or Clemson leveler (contact a wildlife biologist for advice and diagrams). Broadcast the seed at the recommended rate evenly across the area on top of the wet mud. The seed will sink slightly into soft mud and receive enough soil contact to germinate.
Soil test: No lime is necessary
Fertility: No fertilizer is necessary.

Kobe/Korean Lespedeza
Type: Warm season annual legume
Uses: These annual legumes are excellent seed producers for quail and other upland game birds. Deer graze on the plant in the summer. Korean maturing earlier than Kobe but Kobe is more adapted to the South. The plants will reach a height of 2 feet tall and provide cover for quail. The seeds are hard and will lie on the ground for long periods of time into the winter season producing a dependable late winter food source.
Planting Information:
Date: April-July
Rate: 30 pounds/acre or 3/4 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4"

LabLab
Type: Warm season annual legume
Uses: This summer bean is extremely high yielding and drought tolerant. Since it is vulnerable to early grazing pressure, plant in big fields or protect with fencing or repellents. Once established, its high protein makes it excellent for deer throughout the summer and fall until a killing frost. LabLab should be planted with a millet, sorghum or corn to provide a stalk for the vines to climb up. This will help increase its productivity.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 10 pounds/acre or 1/4 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Oklahoma Game Bird Peas (Catjang Peas)
Type: Warm season annual legume
Uses: This is a late maturing cowpea that holds in the hull better than other varieties. The seeds are relished by quail and other game birds. The plants, similar to other cowpeas, produce abundant foliage that is high in protein and excellent for deer with better resistance to heavy grazing pressure than cowpeas.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 40 pounds/acre or 1 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Partridge Peas
Type: Warm season reseeding annual legume
Uses: Partridge peas are slow to establish but are well suited to most any type soil and tolerant of acidic conditions. They will produce abundant yellow flowers late in the summer and small black seeds that are excellent feed for quail. The seeds are hard and will stay in the soil or on the ground all winter as feed. They will consistently reseed and thicken up year after year.
Planting Information:
Date: February-April
Rate: 15 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4"

Crown Vetch
Type: Perennial legume
Uses: A perennial legume that is slow to establish but eventually spreads quickly from rhizomes. Well adapted to most soils in the U.S. but not adapted to the Deep South, it will provide a permanent ground cover and good erosion control. It makes good cover for quail and good browse for deer. It will shed seeds through summer for quail and other game birds.
Planting Information:
Date: April-July
Rate: 15 pounds/acre or 1/2 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/4"

Sesbania
Type: Annual legume
Uses: Sesbania is a large legume commonly known as swamp peas. It is ideal for duck marshes. It will grow upright on a thick stalk 8 to 12 feet tall with long slender seed pods that shatter when mature, making excellent quail feed. It will make thick cover for quail and will stand up in winter flood conditions for ducks. It will thrive in almost any soil type but prefers moist, fertile conditions. It grows rapidly in hot weather and matures in about 90 to 100 days after emergence. Seeds are highly preferred by quail, turkey and doves.
Planting Information:
Date: April-June
Rate: 25 pounds/acre or 3/4 pound/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Soybeans
Type: Warm season annual legume
Uses: Soybeans are very attractive to deer from the onset of emergence. They are so preferred that most small acreage plantings will be killed early by deer grazing pressure. It will not regrow from early browse pressure; hence it needs fencing or repellents in small (less than 5 acre) fields. It is ideal for mixing with grain sorghum, peas, alyce clover or other warm season annual legumes. At maturity it will make high quality seed for game birds and deer. Individual plantings of soybeans can be staggered by planting date to provide season-long production.
Planting Information:
Date: April-August
Rate: 60 pounds/acre or 1 1/2 pounds/1,000 sq.ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Wild Game Food (WGF) Sorghum
Type: Annual grass
Uses: Wild game food sorghum is an early maturing sorghum reaching midbloom at about 40-50 days after emergence. It is bird-resistant which keeps migrating flocks of blackbirds from stripping it in late summer. A mature plant will be 26 inches to 30 inches tall with seed becoming marginally palatable at maturity. As it stands in the weather, it loses tannic acid and becomes more and more palatable through the fall. This sorghum makes excellent seed for all game birds, including quail, turkey, pheasants, doves and ducks. Deer will also feed heavily on the grain in fall and winter.
Planting Information:
Date: April-July
Rate: 5 pounds/acre drilled on 30-inch rows; 15 pounds/acre broadcast; 1/2 pound/1,000 sq. ft.
Depth: 1/2"

Comments
Retweet
Pay Your Bill Online Google+ Buckmasters on Pinterest Follow Us On Instagram! LinkedIn Buckmasters on YouTube Follow Us On Twitter Buckmasters on Facebook!