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Hog Schoolin’

BroadusBy Kevin Broadus

-- After losing access to prime deer hunting land in my home state of Alabama, I was left with only public land to hunt. My best friend had been telling me how much fun it was to hunt hogs, and had put a touch of hog fever in me. So he carried me to some local public lands and took me to hog school.

We hunted the 2006 bow and gun season with no luck. I had a few chances and misjudged my yardage. One was on 80-pounder on the move with his mama. Another was a 300- to 350-pound boar we managed to call in right before sundown.

In came the 2007 season, and the fever was STRONG. I researched what ammunition was legal for hogs in this area and one option was a shotgun using No. 4 shot or smaller. Off I went to the store for ammo with dreams of pork chops in my head.

The next morning, I began to doubt the effectiveness of No. 4 shot on hogs. But the thought of missing the two hogs the previous season kept me going.

I arrived at the hunting grounds just as light began to break on the skyline. It was about 60 degrees, and not a cloud was in the sky. As I neared the spot I'd hunted the previous year, I heard a few low grunts and my heart began to race.

About 60 yards beyond some high grass were 10 hogs. Now my heart felt like it might explode! Was I finally going to get mine?

Determining the best approach was difficult, as the pigs were meandering in every direction. I decided it would be best to just sit still and see if one came to me.

Suddenly, the grass began to shake just 6 feet in front of me. I remember thinking, "Oh my God, he is right there!"

I brought my Mossberg Model 88 pump shotgun to my shoulder and pushed the safety off. The pig was now 2 ½ feet from my gun barrel and didn’t know I was there!

I pulled the trigger, and the quiet of the morning was broken. The hog ran 25 yards past me, then turned and ran 30 yards into the thicket.

Upon recovering the hog, it took two people to get him on the rack. We estimated his weight between 200 to 250 pounds. Now that’s how to cure a fever!

 

 

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