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CWD surveillance continues in North Dakota

From North Dakota Game and Fish Department

-- North Dakota will continue its Hunter-Harvested Surveillance program during the 2011 hunting season, by sampling deer for chronic wasting disease and bovine tuberculosis from 12 units in North Dakota.

All moose and elk harvested in the state are also eligible for testing.

Samples from hunter-harvested deer taken in the central portion of the state will be tested from units 2H, 2I, 2J1, 2J2, 2K1, 2K2, 3A4, 3B3 and 3C. In addition, deer will be tested from units 2C and 2D in the northeast, and unit 3F2 in the southwest.

Every head sampled must have either the deer tag attached, or a new tag can be filled out with the license number, deer hunting unit and date harvested.

For a complete list of locations where Hunters can drop off deer heads visit http://gf.nd.gov/multimedia/news/2011/10/111007.html.

Moose and elk heads should be taken to a Game and Fish office. CWD affects the nervous system of members of the deer family and is always fatal. Scientists have found no evidence that CWD can be transmitted naturally to humans or livestock.

Hunters are also reminded that hunting big game over bait is prohibited on all state owned or managed WMAs, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges and waterfowl production areas, U.S. Forest Service national grasslands, and all North Dakota state school, state park and state forest service lands.

Another state provision prohibits hunting big game over bait on both public and private land in deer unit 3F2.

Hunting over bait is defined as the placement and/or use of baits for attracting big game and other wildlife to a specific location for the purpose of hunting.

Baits include but are not limited to grains, minerals, salts, fruits, vegetables, hay or any other natural or manufactured foods. It does not apply to the use of scents and lures, water, food plots, standing crops or livestock feeds being used in standard practices.

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