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Safety Harness Deer Drag
By Tim H. Martin

Safety Harness Deer Drag

Have you ever shot a deer that took off running and died in a place so inaccessible you couldn’t even get to it with an ATV?

This has happened to me on numerous occasions, including the time a fat 220-pound Alabama 10-pointer ran through a swamp, over a beaver dam and down into a steep ravine, expiring 100 yards from the nearest trail.

There was no getting my 4-wheeler anywhere near that deer, and I was all alone so I had to rely my resourcefulness and improvise lest my buck would have to be left overnight until a buddy could help me drag it out.

Instead of giving the coyotes a free meal, I had an idea. I put on my safety vest, tied the safety strap around the buck’s antlers and began to walk.

I was surprised how easily the buck slipped right along behind me as I bulldozed my way back to the trail. It was certainly much easier than the standard bending over, straining and trying to drag it out by the antlers. My legs did all the work, not my back!

You’ll find this technique really works, even on antlerless deer. Just tie your strap or a rope around its neck and go.

One note of caution; if you plan to mount the buck, make sure you don’t put the strap around its neck or you will end up damaging the brittle hair on the cape. Make sure you tether it by the antlers.


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The number one rule for taking a trophy buck is to not allow the buck to know he’s being hunted. That requires extreme caution, and it also requires not hunting in what others might consider to be the most promising spots. Start by studying the buck...
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Try to match the habits of the deer when calling. Grunting can be effective anywhere, any time. Many pros carry a grunt tube at all times, and for some it’s the only call they use. Try your call when you see a deer to see what kind of “music” your lo...
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Next Year’s Deer
At the end of the season, you might stow your bow and/or gun, but you should get ready for the most productive and important scouting of the year. Winter and early spring offer incredible insight into deer, particularly into buck habitat and behavior...
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Scrape Savvy
Scrapes are like email for sexually active deer. The buck paws out a clean area of soil, usually under an overhanging limb, and urinates in it. If a receptive doe comes by, she also urinates in the scrape. When the buck returns to “check his mail,” h...
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