Register  | Login
  Search
VIDEOS

Buckmasters Tip of the Week

Send Us Your Tip!Email your favorite hunting tip to huntingtips@buckmasters.com. If we use your tip in Buckmasters Tip of the Week E-Newsletter, we will send you a Buckmasters folding knife and a Rack cap autographed by Jackie Bushman. Be sure to use the words "Tip Suggestion" as the subject of your email.

Natural Wind Detector
By Rick Dunker

Natural Wind Detector

My favorite wind detection device is simple, readily available and occurs naturally.

In the late summer, I will go to the field and pick a couple of pods from a milkweed plant. I do this just as the pods are about to open and the seeds are fully formed.

From the pod, I remove the white, fuzzy, feather-like fibers and pick off the seeds. (Milkweed is considered a noxious plant in many states.)

I keep this fuzz in a zip-lock bag and place it in my fanny pack.

When I get to the stand, I take out a little pinch for use during my hunt.

The white fibers are easily visible and they float precisely where the wind takes them, allowing me to observe wind drafts, thermals (rising air) and swirling winds.

One pod will provide enough fuzz to last all season, and sometimes several seasons.

It’s also scent-free and completely natural.

Editor’s Note: By Tim H. Martin

I’ve used Rick’s tip for nearly 20 years, and I’m never in my stand without a little container of milkweed fibers.

To make a dispenser, take a film canister and poke a hole in the center of the lid with a big nail. Pull a little milkweed through the hole to get it started and you can use the canister like a box of Kleenex.

In order to cut down on excess movement, I like to tuck a little clump of milkweed inside my jacket sleeve for easy access during the hunt.

Whenever I want to test the wind, I pinch some off and launch it by blowing it off the tip of my hand. If the breeze is light, the milkweed will stay adrift a long time and all the wind’s subtleties are easily visible.

Until I find a better way to detect the wind, I will continue to use the milkweed trick.


Are You Leaving It Up To Chance?
There's an old saying that in order to take a big buck you have to hunt somewhere that has big bucks. Most hunters realize the logic of that statement, but they tend to think about it on more of a state or regional level. It's even more important ...
 

Medicine For Buck Fever
It's normal to get excited when you see a good buck (or any deer for that matter). But when a big buck comes along, you can't let that excitement turn into buck fever. When you know a deer is a shooter, don't spend time counting points, estim...
 

Get Off the Field
Just seeing deer gets any hunter's heart pumping. That's why it's so hard to resist sitting right on a green field or crop edge -- you definitely see more deer. If you're meat hunting or are taking a youngster out, watching a field can be very pr...
 

Sometimes It's What's Behind You That's Important
Sometimes we focus so much on what we can see from a stand that we forget to think about what the deer sees from his angle. Whether you are hunting with a gun, bow or muzzleloader, you will almost always have to make some kind of movement to get yo...
 

Test Broadheads for Good Arrow Flight
Most bowhunters today realize the importance of tuning their bows and testing their broadhead flight before hunting. Just because one broadhead flies well doesn't mean that you are done tuning, however. Three different broadheads from the same pac...
 

Don't Confuse Practice with Sighting-In
When sighting in a gun or bow, it is imperative to remove as much human influence from the shot as possible. Sighting-in is not practice - it is a process to get your equipment shooting dead-on.
 

New Thoughts on Taking Does
You've probably read dozens of articles recommending harvesting big, healthy does to help reduce deer populations. Other articles talk about how to tell mature does from yearlings to help hunters cull only mature does. But some biologists are taki...
 

Deer Hunting's Public Enemy #1: A Buck's Nose
Deer have an incredible sense of smell. Hunters have seen deer react to the scent of wood shavings, where a limb was sawed to open a shooting lane. There's no substitute for paying attention to the wind and staying downwind of where you expect to ...
 

The Perfect Shot
In taking between 200 and 300 whitetails in my lifetime, I've tried just about every shot you can take. In my mind, there's no better place to shoot a deer than behind the shoulder. Whether I'm shooting an arrow or a bullet, I'm trying to get both...
 

Dial In Your Turkey Gun
Every year, more than three million hunters flock to the hardwoods, bottomlands, rolling hills, pine forests and numerous other landscapes in pursuit of the wild turkey. And, every year, some of them walk out of the hunt with a hollow feeling of d...
 
Page 19 of 25First   Previous   14  15  16  17  18  [19]  20  21  22  23  Next   Last   
Pay Your Bill Online Google+ Buckmasters on Pinterest Follow Us On Instagram! LinkedIn Buckmasters on YouTube Follow Us On Twitter Buckmasters on Facebook!

State DNR's

Check out up-to-date state
 and legislative news!

Find your state and read about the hunting and fishing regulations for 2014.

Click here
to get started.