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THIS IS MY TOWN (TELL ABOUT YOURS)
Last Post 15 Jun 2010 07:27 PM by pinetree. 39 Replies.
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07 Sep 2007 03:56 PM  
Atchison Kansas

Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. The population was estimated to be 10,169 in the year 2005.[1] It is the county seat and most populous city of Atchison County. The city is named in honor of David Rice Atchison, United States senator from Missouri, and was the original eastern terminus of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.



Atchison was the birthplace of aviatrix Amelia Earhart: the Amelia Earhart Festival held each July annually attracts an estimated 30,000–50,000 people.
 
   

Atchison is a charming and historic town on the bluffs of the Missouri River in the northeast corner of Kansas. It is noted for its grand Victorian homes along brick-paved streets and its important role in the early history of Kansas. Atchison is a great place for business and living. A unique city in the region, Atchison is one of the oldest industrial communities in Kansas and boasts a proud 
educational heritage. 



Atchison is the east terminus of the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe Railroad, and the home of the oldest Roman Catholic establishment in Kansas, St. Benedict's Abbey and Mount St. Scholastica Convent. In addition to its rich history in the field of education, the Abbey and the St. Benedict's Church on Benedictine College grounds are tourist attractions in Atchison. Additionally, Atchison has numerous buildings, including the post office and courthouse, on the National Register of Historic Places. Some buildings serve as museums and art galleries and attract tourists on a regular basis. As the site for both the first passenger railroad depot in Atchison, as well as its first hotel, the riverfront has been another special asset to the community.

Throughout the year, residents and visitors enjoy a wide variety of community events from the River Bend Art Festival on Memorial Day weekend to the Oktoberfest Arts & Crafts Festival the first weekend in October.
The world's most famous aviatrix, Amelia Earhart was born in Atchison on July 24, 1897. Numerous sites and attractions in Atchison provide the opportunity to learn about Earhart's childhood in Atchison and her amazing life as a pilot, celebrity and role model. Each year Atchison honors her birth with a grand weekend long festival and one of the largest fireworks displays in Kansas.




It is often called one of the most haunted places in America, due to the city's ghost-story heritage, featured in the 1997 book, "Haunted Kansas," written by Lisa Hefner Heitz, and published by University Press of Kansas. You can check out all the hauntings on this link- 

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/OZ-HauntedAtchison.html





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The Sallie House



Sallie's, the Heartland Ghost, North 2nd Street Home – Sallie, the “Heartland Ghost,” is said to haunt this house that once belonged to a local doctor. The tale of Sallie’s ghost has been featured three times on the popular 1990’s paranormal television show Sightings, as well as Unexplained Mysteries. Long ago, six-year old Sallie grew terribly sick during the night with severe abdominal pains. Sallie’s mother rushed her to the doctor’s house, where his family lived on the upper floor and he operated his practice on the main floor.

 

Sallie’s mother listened as the doctor diagnosed young Sallie with a severe case of appendicitis, requiring immediate surgery. The little girl panicked at the sight of the surgical tools and the doctor was forced to hold her down to give her ether.

 

 

 

 

 

However, in his haste, the physician did not allow the anesthesia to take its full effect and began operating. Sallie awoke during the initial incision and began fighting and wresting against the pain. Before she died, she was said to have looked at the doctor with both fear and loathing, and remains within the house to this day.

In 1993, the house was rented to a young couple who reported that Sallie made an almost immediate appearance, playing frequent pranks such turning electrical appliances on and off, turning pictures upside down, and scattering their child’s toys about the nursery.

Shortly after these harmless pranks, the ghostly activities turned malevolent, with the young husband suffering from frequent attacks. The couple also experienced a number of small spontaneous fires throughout the house. In fact, when the Sightings crew was at the house filming for the upcoming show, a red welt appeared on the stomach of the man and then began to bleed. The man, who described a severe drop in temperature prior to the attacks, would often be left with a number of long bloody scratches.

 

At their wits end, a psychic was consulted who informed the couple that there were actually two spirits within the house. The psychic indicated that it was not Sallie who was responsible for the malevolent activities, but rather a ghostly woman of about 30. While Sallie may have been responsible for the harmless pranks, it was this older woman who was the evil one. Allegedly, this mysterious woman was, at first, fond of the gentleman who lived in the house and tried to get close to him, while at the same time, attempting to drive a wedge between he and his wife. When she was unsuccessful at this, she began to attack the husband.

 

Finally, after the husband felt a strong shove from behind that nearly sent him over the stair railing, the couple could no longer take it and moved from the house.

 

Since, this couple has moved, later residents have reported no activity occurring in the house.

 

In addition to being featured on the popular TV series Sightings, the Sallie House Haunting was also made into a made-for-TV movie called Haunted Heartland that first aired on Showtime.


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Molly's Hollow


Jackson Park – A woman by the name of “Molly” is said to haunt this park. Supposedly, moaning and terrifying screams can be heard throughout the park around midnight. According to one legend, Molly was a beautiful young woman who was found dead in the park the day after her prom. She was found hanging by her neck to a park tree in a hollow with her clothes badly torn. Allegedly, she and her date had argued the night before and when Molly exited the car, her date drove off leaving her in the park. It was never determined if her death was by her own hand or was a murder. Though, some suspected that her prom date killed her, no one was ever charged.
 
Another legend of the park's haunting states that Molly was a black woman who was lynched by a white mob years ago. Rather than the eerie screams of a young prom girl, the cries instead come from the brutal slaying of an African-American Molly. In any case, the area today is known as Molly’s Hollow where couples go to "park." In addition to Molly’s chilling cries, many witnesses also claim to have seen a ghostly figure hanging in the tree where her body was discovered.

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07 Sep 2007 07:05 PM  
My home town is located about 20 min south of Tuscaloosa.Not much happens here,just a small friendly town called Moundville,Alabama.
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07 Sep 2007 10:50 PM  
my town of marshfield mo. is a quit little town . the enventer of the hubble telescope was from here and presentdent. Buch SR. came here to see are towns 4 of the july paraid in 1990.
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08 Sep 2007 12:29 PM  
My home town of Council Bluffs, Iowa is also situated along the Missouri River. It is across the river of Omaha, Nebraska. And it gets pretty busy during the summer when the CWS (College World Series) goes on in Omaha as the Stadium is only a mile from my home town and it is also 2 or 3 miles from 3 casino's in my home town. The casino's names are Ameristar, Horseshoe, and Harrah's.

Google is now in the process of opening up a service center in my home town. And my hometown last I heard was the 3rd largest city in Iowa. But according to infoplease.com is says it is the 7th largest city. So I don't know where that resent information I heard about 6 to 8 months ago came from.

And the really weird thing about Council Bluffs, is most people say that they have never heard of it. But it is in the News a lot, especially just before presidential elections. Because one of the cities in Iowa that all of the candidates goes to, is my home town of Council Bluffs, Iowa. Just as they have 3 or 4 times so far just in the last month or 2.

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08 Sep 2007 08:22 PM  
I know where Council Bluffs is I was about a mile from your house Not at the CWS but I was at the Omaha Zoo Great zoo would love to go back Would also someday go see the CWS.  
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10 Sep 2007 09:20 AM  
Come on Guys & Gals lets here about your neck of the Woods.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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11 Sep 2007 08:12 PM  

Born, raised and live in Miami Florida.

Miami Florida

Miami is a major city in southeastern Florida, in the United States. It is the county seat of Miami-Dade County. Miami is a gamma world city with an estimated population of 404,048. It is the largest city within the South Florida metropolitan area, which is the largest metropolitan area in the Southeastern United States with 5.4 million people. Miami and its surrounding cities make up the fifth largest urban area in the United States.Ώ]

Miami's importance as an international financial and cultural center has elevated Miami to the status of world city. Because of Miami's cultural and linguistic ties to North, South, and Central America, as well as the Caribbean, Miami is many times referred to as "The Gateway of the Americas." Florida's large Spanish-speaking population and strong economic ties to Latin America also make Miami and the surrounding region an important center of the Hispanic world.

Miami is also home to one of the largest, most influential ports in the United States, the Port of Miami. The port is often called the "Cruise Capital of the World" and the "Cargo Gateway of the Americas". It has retained its status as the number one cruise/passenger port in the world for well over a decade accommodating the largest cruise ships and the major cruise lines.

Today, Miami is undergoing a massive building boom that ranks second worldwide (and first in the United States) for the most buildings under construction that will be over 492 feet (150 m), with over 24 of such buildings currently under construction. Miami's skyline also currently ranks third in the U.S. behind Chicago and New York City, and (18th in the world) according to the 2006 Almanac of Architecture and Design.ΐ] Including other nearby neighborhoods and cities, the Miami area has over 80 highrise towers under construction, such as the Biscayne Wall in Downtown Miami, a row of skyscrapers being built along the west side of Biscayne Boulevard. Miami currently has the five tallest skyscrapers in the state of Florida with the tallest being the Four Seasons Hotel & Tower.Α]

At 35.68 square miles (92 km² of land area, Miami is the second smallest primary city of an urban area of one million or more in the U.S. (after Providence, Rhode Island, at 18.5 square miles (48 km²).Β] This represents a major gap in the rank of the city, and urban area: The Urban Area is ranked at #5, the city is ranked 38 places lower at #43. The difference between the Urban and Metro population is very small, only 544,821. This is mainly due to the fact that Miami's urban area is built on a very narrow, linear area, and is blocked on the east and west by ocean and national park, respectively.

History

Approximately 400 males voted for Miami's incorporation in 1896 in the building to the left.
Approximately 400 males voted for Miami's incorporation in 1896 in the building to the left.

Miami was officially incorporated as a city on July 28, 1896,[5] though the area was first inhabited for more than a thousand years by the Tequesta Indians and was claimed for Spain in 1566 by Pedro Menéndez de Avilés. A Spanish mission was established a year later in 1567. In the mid-1800s Fort Dallas was built and subsequently, was a site of fighting during the Second Seminole War. In the 1920s, Miami prospered through the Florida Land Boom of the 1920's with an increase in population and infrastructure. By 1940, 172,172 people lived in the city and Miami had grown to become a large, growing city.

The Miami area was better known as “Biscayne Bay Country” in the early years of its growth. Some published reports described the area as a promising wilderness.[6] The area was also characterized as “one of the finest building sites in Florida.”[7] However, the Great Freeze of 1894 changed all that, and the crops of the Miami area were the only ones in Florida that survived. Julia Tuttle, a local citrus grower, convinced Henry Flagler, a railroad tycoon, to expand his Florida East Coast Railroad to Miami. On July 28, 1896, Miami was officially incorporated as a city with a population of just over 300.

Miami prospered during the 1920s but weakened after the collapse of the Florida land boom of the 1920's, the 1926 Miami Hurricane and the Great Depression in the 1930s. When World War II began, Miami, well-situated due to its location on the southern coast of Florida, played an important role in the battle against German submarines. The war helped to expand Miami's population to almost half a million. After Fidel Castro rose to power in 1959, many Cubans emigrated to Miami, further increasing the population. In the 1980s and 1990s, various crises struck South Florida, among them the Arthur McDuffie beating and the subsequent riot, drug wars, Hurricane Andrew, and the Elián González uproar. Miami remains a major international financial and cultural center.

Geography

Miami and its suburbs are located on a broad plain between the Florida Everglades to the west and Biscayne Bay to the east that also extends from Florida Bay north to Lake Okeechobee. The elevation of the area never rises above 40 ft (12 m)[8] and averages at around 6 ft (2 m)[9] above mean sea level in most neighborhoods, especially near the coast. The highest undulations are found along the coastal Miami Rock Ridge, whose substrate underlies most of the eastern Miami metropolitan region. The main portion of the city lies on the shores of Biscayne Bay which contains several hundred natural and artificially-created barrier islands, the largest of which contains the city of Miami Beach and its famous South Beach district. The Gulf Stream, a warm ocean current, runs northward just 15 miles (24.1 km) off the coast, allowing the city's climate to stay warm and mild all year.

Geology

View from one of the high points in Miami, west of downtown from SW 9th Street. The western part of the city (Little Havana) has points as high as 40' above sea level.Photo: Marc Averette
View from one of the high points in Miami, west of downtown from SW 9th Street. The western part of the city (Little Havana) has points as high as 40' above sea level.Photo: Marc Averette

The surface bedrock under the Miami area is called Miami oolite or Miami limestone. This bedrock is covered by a thin layer of soil, and is no more than 50 feet (15 m) thick. Miami limestone formed as the result of the drastic changes in sea level associated with recent glaciations or ice ages. Beginning some 130,000 years ago the Sangamon interglacial raised sea levels to approximately 25 feet (7.5 m.) above the current level. All of southern Florida was covered by a shallow sea. Several parallel lines of reef formed along the edge of the submerged Florida plateau, stretching from the present Miami area to what is now the Dry Tortugas. The area behind this reef line was in effect a large lagoon, and the Miami limestone formed throughout the area from the deposition of oolites and the shells of bryozoans. Starting about 100,000 years ago the Wisconsin glaciation began lowering sea levels, exposing the floor of the lagoon. By 15,000 years ago, the sea level had dropped to 300 to 350 feet below the contemporary level. The sea level rose quickly after that, stabilizing at the current level about 4000 years ago, leaving the mainland of South Florida just above sea level.

Beneath the plain lies the Biscayne Aquifer,[10] a natural underground source of fresh water that extends from southern Palm Beach County to Florida Bay, with its highest point peaking around the cities of Miami Springs and Hialeah. Most of the South Florida metropolitan area obtains its drinking water from this aquifer. As a result of the aquifer, it is not possible to dig more than 15 to 20ft (4.57 to 6.1 m) beneath the city without hitting water, which impedes underground construction. For this reason there is no subway system in Miami.

Most of the western fringes of the city extend into the Everglades, a subtropical marshland located in the southern portion of the U.S. state of Florida. This causes occasional problems with local wildlife such as alligators venturing into Miami communities and major highways.

In terms of land area, Miami is one of the smallest major cities in the United States. According to the US Census Bureau, the city encompasses a total area of 55.27 mi² (143.15 km²). Of that area, 35.67 mi² (92.68 km² is land and 19.59 mi² (50.73 km² is water. That means Miami comprises over 400,000 people in a mere 35 square miles, making it one of the most densely populated cities in the United States, along with New York City, San Francisco, and Chicago among others. Miami is located at 25°47′16″N, 80°13′27″W.GR1

Climate

Typical summer afternoon shower rolling in from the Everglades. Photo: Marc Averette
Typical summer afternoon shower rolling in from the Everglades. Photo: Marc Averette

Miami has a true tropical climate (Köppen climate classification Aw),[11] with hot, humid summers, and warm, dry winters. The city does experience cold fronts from November through March. However, the average monthly temperature for any month has never been recorded as being under 64.4°F (January averages 67°F).[12] Most of the year is warm and humid, and the summers are almost identical to the climate of the Caribbean tropics. In addition, the city gets most of its rain in the summer (wet season) and is relatively dry in winter (dry season). The wet season, which is hot and humid, lasts from May to September, when it gives way to the dry season, which features mild temperatures with some invasions of colder air, which is when the little winter rainfall occurs — with the passing of a front. The hurricane season largely coincides with the wet season.

In addition to its sea-level elevation, coastal location and position just above the Tropic of Cancer, the area owes its warm, humid climate to the Gulf Stream, which moderates climate year-round. A typical summer day does not have temperatures below 75 °F (24 °C). Temperatures in the high 80s to low 90s (30-35 °C) accompanied by high humidity are often relieved by afternoon thunderstorms or a sea breeze that develops off the Atlantic Ocean, which then allow lower temperatures, although conditions still remain very muggy. During winter, humidity is significantly lower, allowing for cooler weather to develop. Average minimum temperatures during that time are around 59 °F (15 °C), rarely dipping below 40 °F (4 °C), and the equivalent maxima usually range between 65 and 75 °F (18-24 °C).

The 1997 Miami tornado
The 1997 Miami tornado

Miami has never recorded a triple-digit temperature; the highest temperature recorded was 98 °F (37 °C).[13] However, extreme summer humidity often boosts the heat index to around 110 °F (43 °C). The coldest temperature ever recorded in the city of Miami was 30 °F (-1 °C) on several occasions.[14] Miami has only once recorded snowfall, on January 20, 1977. Weather conditions for the area around Miami were recorded sporadically from 1839 until 1900, with many years-long gaps. A cooperative temperature and rainfall recording site was established in what is now downtown Miami in December, 1900. An official Weather Bureau Office was opened in Miami in June, 1911.[15]

Miami receives abundant rainfall, one of the highest among major U.S. cities. Most of this rainfall occurs from mid-May through early October. It receives annual rainfall of 58.6 inches (1488 mm)[16], whereas nearby Fort Lauderdale and Miami Beach receive 63.8 in (1621 mm) and 48.3 in (1227 mm), respectively, which demonstrates the high local variability in rainfall rates. Hurricane season officially runs from June 1 through November 30, although hurricanes can develop beyond those dates. The most likely time for Miami to be hit is during the peak of the Cape Verde season which is mid August through the end of September.[17] Due to its location between two major bodies of water known for tropical activity, Miami is also statistically the most likely major city in the world to be struck by a hurricane, trailed closely by Nassau, Bahamas, and Havana, Cuba. Despite this, the city has been fortunate in not having a direct hit by a hurricane since Hurricane Cleo in 1964.[18] However, many other hurricanes have affected the city, including Betsy in 1965, Andrew in 1992, Irene in 1999, and Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma in 2005. In addition, a tropical depression in October of 2000 passed over the city, causing record rainfall and flooding. Locally, the storm is credited as the No Name Storm of 2000, though the depression went on to become Tropical Storm Leslie upon entering the Atlantic Ocean.

Of course, I hunt in the Everglades:

 

101 Everglades 101: An Introduction to the Ecosystem
E V E R G L A D E S   N A T I O N A L   P A R K

 

Water management is the critical issue for the Everglades.

National parks are not islands of land. Outside events shape their fates. Water management is the critical issue for the Everglades, whose watershed begins in central Florida's Kissimmee River basin. Historic water flow mapSummer storms flooding there once started a shallow, wide river flowing southward to the Gulf of Mexico. Elaborate water controls now disrupt the natural flow. Short of clean water at critical seasons, and in the correct quantities, the Everglades will die.

South Florida's freshwater supply comes from rain on the Kissimmee River basin and southward, mostly in May through October. Evaporation, transpiration, and runoff consume four-fifths of the rain, which may total 40 to 65 inches (100 to 165 cm) per year.

Slow and rain-driven, the natural cycle of freshwater circulation historically built up in shallow Lake Okeechobee. It averages 12 feet (3.7 meters) deep and covers 730 square miles (1890 square kilometers).

Thus began the flow of the wide, shallow "River of Grass." Fifty miles (80 km) wide in places, one to three feet (0.3 to 0.9 meters) deep in the slough's center but only 6 inches (15 cm) deep elsewhere, it flowed south 100 feet (30 meters) per day across Everglades sawgrass toward mangrove estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico. A six-month dry season followed.

Everglades plants and animals are adapted to alternating wet and dry seasons. Water cycle disruptions ruin crucial feeding and nesting conditions.

During the dry season (December to April), water levels gradually drop. Fish migrate to deeper pools. Birds, alligators, and other predators concentrate around the pools to feed on a varied menu of fish, amphibians, and reptiles. This abundant food source is vital to many wading birds who are nesting during the dry season.

In May, spring thunderstorms signal the beginning of the wet season. A winter landscape dotted with pools of water yields to a summer landscape almost completely covered with water. Wildlife disperses throughout the park. Insects, fish, and alligators repopulate the 'glades, thus replenishing the food chain. By December, the rains cease and the dry cycle begins again.







Make sure not to get lost!  It is 90 miles wide and many explorers in the 1800s never made it across.  It is a leg breaking, treacherous journey!



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11 Sep 2007 09:32 PM  
Cool pics Chuck!
Tubby
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11 Sep 2007 10:06 PM  
Posted By tubby on 09/11/2007 3:32 PM
Cool pics Chuck!


Thanks Tubby!  Smileycons!
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11 Sep 2007 11:39 PM  
My town is New Orleans.  I don't think I'll present as great a description as Chuck's.  
Most people know about my town.  
Chuck Manetta
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12 Sep 2007 12:06 AM  
Posted By Howard on 09/11/2007 5:39 PM
My town is New Orleans.  I don't think I'll present as great a description as Chuck's.  
Most people know about my town.  


Sorry Howard!   Smileycons!

(I blame a lot of people!)  Smileycons!

It took us 10 years to recover from Hurricane Andrew and there are still plenty of evidence from it's destruction left over.  (And we weren't built in a bowl!)  

There is nothing saying we won't look like that again too the way it's going.    Smileycons!
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12 Sep 2007 12:31 AM  
Posted By Chuck Manetta on 09/11/2007 6:06 PM
Posted By Howard on 09/11/2007 5:39 PM
My town is New Orleans.  I don't think I'll present as great a description as Chuck's.  
Most people know about my town.  


Sorry Howard!   Smileycons!

(I blame a lot of people!)  Smileycons!

It took us 10 years to recover from Hurricane Andrew and there are still plenty of evidence from it's destruction left over.  (And we weren't built in a bowl!)  

There is nothing saying we won't look like that again too the way it's going.    Smileycons!

10 years?      I don't know what type of aid was available back then, but given the $$ situation in Florida it appears that we'll be in for a 15+ year recovery period, although the tourist core(Bourbon Street) is up and running.  Looks like the season thus far has treated the country well.  Have a good hunting season...look forward to pics of good news and no injuries from tree stands. 
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12 Sep 2007 01:06 AM  
Yep!  At least 10 years.

Andrew routed a path of total destruction 30 miles wide completely through the state.  (It was really unbelieveable!)

Rita was a water event.  Andrew was a wind event.





Look at this 1X4 way up this surviving tree.



This is the Everglades on the other side of the state:

Chuck Manetta
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13 Sep 2007 03:05 AM  
I live in a town called Jay, Maine. Maine has a slow paced way of life. As for my town, I have lived here almost all of my life, only six years in a different town. I live on the land that I grew up on. I work at the local mill. Jay used to be called "Phips Canada", it was incorporated in 1795. Here is a segment from a gazetteer printed in 1886. "The township which is now Jay was granted to Capt. Joseph Phips and sixty-three others, for services in the French war of 1755, and was for a long time known as Phip’s Canada. It was incorporated in 1795, and named for Hon. John Jay. the eminent patriot and statesmen. The conditions of the grant were that it should be divided into rights of 400 acres each, one of which was to be reserved for Harvard College, one for the use of the University, and one for the schools. A settling committee appointed by the associates subsequently purchased the whole. There were no settlements previous to the close of the Revolutionary war. The earliest settlers were Simon Coolidge, Oliver Fuller, Samuel Eustis, Scarborough Parker, Moses Crafts, Isaac West, Thomas Fuller, Joseph Hyde, Nathaniel Jackson, Samuel Jackson, William Godding and William Atkinson. Jay Hill was first settled by James Starr in 1802." There isn't much else to tell. I am so glad that we have electricity now. I wish that they had discoverd it a hundred years ago. I am anxious to see a television and an automobile. I hope they find a better way to fuel the trains, coal is really getting to be hard to get. Thank for askin'.
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17 Sep 2007 04:25 PM  
the everglades are huge.
go dale jr. #88
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18 Sep 2007 01:00 AM  
I live close to Minor Hill tn population 437 as of 2000, wehave 2 stores, a post office a school, and a couple of churches
AIN'T I IN HEVEN
bet you wish you were here
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18 Sep 2007 01:14 AM  
I am currently in the blacksburg, Va. area. Any body who watches the news knows just about the same amount as me(Virginia Tech Shootings)
Thank you caption obvious...I am so fortunate to have you with me.
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18 Sep 2007 01:42 AM  
I live in Grandville,Michigan.
Across the street from my house is a lil strip mall containing a post office,hotdog resteraunt,liquar store. Grandville is not as small as some towns but not as large as others. We have Rivertowns Crossings mall that has 50 + stores including Dicks Sporting goods. We also have a Walmart,Steak'n'shake,and a Gander Mountain. I love my town.

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25 Sep 2007 03:43 AM  
St. Thomas , Ontario , Canada , population of 36000 and growing, was known as the railway capitol of Canada, but it`s probable best known as the city that P.T. Barnum and Bailey`s elephant Jumbo was killed by a train in 1885. There`s a monument on top of the hill as you drive into the city from the east naturally it`s a full sized elephant.
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27 Sep 2007 03:04 PM  
I live in a town called Beaufort, MO. There isn't even a stoplight. You can enter and leave my town in about 15 seconds (not even exaggerating). We have 2 gas stations,a bank,an ancient hardware store,and a feed store. Yep..that's all. Along with..maybe..a dozen houses..if that. But everyone here is real friendly. Everyone is most likely related to someone or almost everyone in the town. We all know everyone..we all know the gossip about everyone. But it's a good way of life..and there's a lot of good people out here.
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