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Detection of CWD prions in salivary, urinary, and intestinal tissues of deer: potential mechanisms of prion shedding and transmission
Last Post 03 May 2011 06:47 PM by flounder. 0 Replies.
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03 May 2011 06:47 PM  
Detection of CWD prions in salivary, urinary, and intestinal tissues of deer: potential mechanisms of prion shedding and transmission

Nicholas J. Haley1, Candace K. Mathiason1, Scott Carver1, Mark Zabel1, Glenn C. Telling2, and Edward A. Hoover1,*

1 Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

2 Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA

* Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523. Phone: (970)491-7587, Fax: (970)491-0523. Email: Edward.Hoover@colostate.edu

ABSTRACT

Efficient horizontal transmission is a signature trait of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids. Infectious prions shed into excreta appear to play a key role in this facile transmission, as has been demonstrated by bioassay in cervid and transgenic species and serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). However, the source(s) of infectious prions in these body fluids have yet to be identified. In the present study, we analyzed tissues proximate to saliva, urine, and feces production by sPMCA in an attempt to elucidate this unique aspect of CWD pathogenesis. Oropharyngeal, urogenital, and gastrointestinal tissues, along with blood and obex from CWD-exposed cervids (comprising 27 animals and >350 individual samples) were analyzed and scored based on apparent relative CWD burden. PrPCWD-generating activity was detected in a range of tissues, and was highest in salivary gland, urinary bladder, and the distal intestinal tract. In the same assays, blood from the same animals and unseeded normal brain homogenate controls (n= 116 of 117) remained negative. PrP-converting activity in peripheral tissues varied from 10-11 to 100 - fold that found in brain of the same animal. Deer with highest levels of PrPCWD amplification in the brain had higher and more widely disseminated prion amplification in excretory tissues. Interestingly, PrPCWD was not demonstrable by conventional western blotting in these excretory tissues, suggesting low prion burden or the presence of protease-sensitive infectious prions destroyed by harsh proteolytic treatments. These findings offer unique insights into the transmission of CWD in particular, and prion infection and trafficking overall.



http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/content/abst...00425-11v1





http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/





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