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Species Barrier May Protect Macaques from Chronic Wasting Disease
Last Post 04 Aug 2009 03:51 PM by flounder. 0 Replies.
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04 Aug 2009 03:51 PM  
Greetings BuckMasters !

The following study is good news, but do NOT let this study fool anyone. It proves nothing for humans. well, at least that is what the officials have been telling us for decades when they transmit all these other TSEs to all these other species, ''oh, that they DID transmit to mouse, to mole, to hamsters, to primate, to squirrel monkeys, to Cynomolgus macaques, etc. etc. i could go on, but these are NOT humans, so the study means little toward human transmission'' etc.
 
 
i saw this headline the other day in the newspaper that some fool wrote ;
 
 
News Canada Humans likely resistant to disease found in deer: study By BOB WEBER, THE CANADIAN PRESS
 
Last Updated: 4th August 2009, 1:43am
 
 
 
http://www.edmontonsun.com/news/canada/2009/08/04/10353111-sun.html
 
 
 

U.S. study: deer infected with chronic wasting disease safe to eat

 
 
who ever wrote this story with the headlines will needlessly expose many to this disease, through nothing more than sensationalized media hype. and what about second hand transmission via friendly fire? have any of you ever looked at the real threat here from second, third, fourth passage etc. from TSE's. i keep trying to tell people that the consumption of cwd infected deer or elk might kill some, but it is the 'friendly fire', that is the bigger threat in my opinion. as the TSEs mutate, and or as they are passaged 1, 2, 3, times, they become more virulent. By changing what this study really showed, and sensationalizing the subject title with fiction, you saw what happened next, every other five and dime reporter picked up on the sensationalized subject, that was completely fabricated. I could care less who eats CWD tainted meat, but it's the after affects, the exposing millions, when they don't even know it, to possibly suffer the horrible consequences years, decades later, is not acceptable, and these five and dime news reporters are just as responsible for senselessly and needlessly exposing others with lazy reporting of sensationalized media reporting. then the other five and dimers pick up on it, and it spreads, just like CWD and BSe do, and you have every hunter out there now that will say that it's now o.k. to eat CWD infected deer and elk, because this study said that. THAT'S I NOT WHAT THIS STUDY SAID DAMN'T !!!
 
 
 
 
Science Daily (press release) - ‎22 hours ago‎
3, 2009) — Data from an ongoing multi-year study suggest that people who consume deer and elk with chronic wasting disease (CWD) may be protected from ...
 
 
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090730111152.htm
 
 
 
 
US study suggests deer infected with chronic wasting disease safe ... Bridge River Lillooet News - ?21 hours ago? A new study has added to evidence that meat from deer infected with chronic wasting disease - an infection similar to mad cow disease - is safe for humans ...
 
People Who Eat Deer And Elk With Chronic Wasting Disease May Avoid ...
 
Science Daily (press release) - ?22 hours ago? 3, 2009) — Data from an ongoing multi-year study suggest that people who consume deer and elk with chronic wasting disease (CWD) may be protected from ...
 
US study suggests deer infected with chronic wasting disease safe ...
 
Medicine Hat News - ?22 hours ago? EDMONTON - A new study has added to evidence that meat from deer infected with chronic wasting disease - an infection similar to mad cow disease - is safe ...
 
US study suggests deer infected with chronic wasting disease safe ...
 
Winnipeg Free Press - Bob Weber - ?Aug 3, 2009? EDMONTON - A new study has added to evidence that meat from deer infected with chronic wasting disease - an infection similar to mad cow disease - is safe ...
 
US study suggests deer infected with chronic wasting disease safe ...
 
CanadaEast.com - ?Aug 3, 2009? EDMONTON - A new study has added to evidence that meat from deer infected with chronic wasting disease - an infection similar to mad cow disease - is safe ...
 
The Canadian Press US study suggests deer infected with chronic wasting disease safe ... The Canadian Press - ?Aug 3, 2009? EDMONTON — A new study has added to evidence that meat from deer infected with chronic wasting disease - an infection similar to mad cow disease - is safe ...
 
 
http://news.google.com/news?um=1&ned=us&hl=en&q=chronic+wasting+disease&cf=all&scoring=d&start=10
 
 
 
o.k. let's look at what the study really said, and then the facts to date ;
 
 
 
For Immediate Release Wednesday, July 29, 2009



Species Barrier May Protect Macaques from Chronic Wasting Disease


Data from an ongoing multi-year study suggest that people who consume deer and elk with chronic wasting disease (CWD) may be protected from infection by an inability of the CWD infectious agent to spread to people. The results to date show that 14 cynomolgus macaques exposed orally or intracerebrally to CWD remain healthy and symptom free after more than six years of observation, though the direct relevance to people is not definitive and remains under study. Cynomolgus macaques often are used as research models of human disease because they are very close genetically to humans and are susceptible to several forms of human brain-damaging disease. Thus, it was decided to see whether exposure to CWD could induce disease in the macaques. The study appears online in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

CWD is a type of brain-damaging disease known as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) or prion disease. CWD primarily affects deer, elk, and moose. Other TSE diseases include mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep, and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Humans are not susceptible to sheep scrapie, but BSE appears to have infected about 200 people, primarily in Europe in the 1990s. Those findings provided the rationale for the present CWD-macaque study, which began in 2003.

"We plan to continue this study for at least several more years because, although the risk to macaques so far appears to be low, we know that these diseases can take more than 10 years to develop," says Bruce Chesebro, M.D., chief of the Laboratory of Persistent Viral Diseases at Rocky Mountain Laboratories (RML) in Hamilton, Mont. RML is part of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The RML group is leading the study with collaborators from the Colorado Division of Wildlife; State University of New York Downstate Medical Center; New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities; American Red Cross; and the University of Wyoming.

The findings by the RML group support published field studies done by others in regions of Colorado and Wyoming where CWD is endemic. Between 1979 and 2001, there were no significant increases in human TSE diseases despite the likelihood that hunters in those areas were exposed to CWD through contact with infected animal tissue and contaminated hunting tools such as knives and saws. Extensive laboratory data also supports a human species barrier against CWD.

Notably, the RML study also included identical testing in squirrel monkeys, which are genetically less similar to humans than macaques. Of 15 squirrel monkeys exposed orally to CWD, two displayed disease symptoms 69 months after infection. Of 13 squirrel monkeys exposed intracerebrally to CWD, 11 displayed symptoms between 33 and 53 months after infection. In symptomatic animals, the presence of the CWD agent was confirmed in brain, spleen and lymph nodes.

The results in squirrel monkeys were not surprising because a study elsewhere in two squirrel monkeys yielded similar results. The study by the RML group was different, however, in that it tested oral exposure to CWD and also studied eight CWD samples from different areas of the country. The results in squirrel monkeys confirmed that disease progression in that species appears consistent with disease progression in deer and elk, where severe weight loss is nearly always present.

"The fact that the squirrel monkeys, like the deer and elk, suffered severe weight loss suggests that chronic wasting disease might affect a common region of the brain in different species," notes Dr. Chesebro.

NIAID conducts and supports research - at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide-to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) - The Nation's Medical Research Agency - includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Reference: Race B et al. Susceptibilities of nonhuman primates to chronic wasting disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. DOI: 10.3201/eid1509.090253.
 
 

http://www.nih.gov/news/health/jul2009/niaid-29.htm
 
 
 
 
what other science has shown ;
 
 
Program ID: Innovation Anthology #214 Program Date: 04/07/2009 Program Category: Health and Medicine, Prions, Social Sciences, Wildlife

CWD Potential Risk to Human Health Chronic wasting disease is an emerging epidemic among deer and elk on the prairies.

CWD is the cervid equivalent of mad cow disease. And according to Dr. Daniel Krewski, an expert in population health risk assessment, prion researchers are very worried about the impact of CWD on human health.

DR. DANIEL KREWSKI: And what would happen if that disease were to jump the species barrier. Hunters who consume deer and elk who may have CWD What we would like to do is get out ahead of the risk curve and try to anticipate and prevent the next transmission of a disease of this type to humans. So we are focusing on is it possible that CWD could transmit to humans? We will be hosting an expert group meeting in Ottawa where we are bringing over 10 international experts in this area to ask that question. Are there things that we can do to try to prevent that from happening as was the case with BSE turning into vCJD (variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease) from the consumption of beef contaminated with the BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) agent?

Dr. Krewski emphasizes the importance of investing now in preventive action to contain chronic wasting disease.

Thanks today to Canadian Institutes for Health Research.
 
 http://www.innovationanthology.com/programs.php?id=229

 


Sunday, April 12, 2009

CWD UPDATE Infection Studies in Two Species of Non-Human Primates and one Environmental reservoir infectivity study and evidence of two strains
 
 http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/04/cwd-update-infection-studies-in-two.html

 


Thursday, April 03, 2008

A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease

2008 1: Vet Res. 2008 Apr 3;39(4):41

A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease

Sigurdson CJ.

snip...

*** twenty-seven CJD patients who regularly consumed venison were reported to the Surveillance Center***,

snip...

full text ;
 
 http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/04/prion-disease-of-cervids-chronic.html


 

From: TSS (216-119-163-189.ipset45.wt.net)

Subject: CWD aka MAD DEER/ELK TO HUMANS ???

Date: September 30, 2002 at 7:06 am PST

From: "Belay, Ermias"

To:

Cc: "Race, Richard (NIH)" ; ; "Belay,

Ermias"

Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 9:22 AM

Subject: RE: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Dear Sir/Madam,

In the Archives of Neurology you quoted (the abstract of which was

attached to your email), we did not say CWD in humans will present like

variant CJD.

That assumption would be wrong. I encourage you to read the whole

article and call me if you have questions or need more clarification

(phone: 404-639-3091). Also, we do not claim that "no-one has ever been

infected with prion disease from eating venison." Our conclusion stating

that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans in the

article you quoted or in any other forum is limited to the patients we

investigated.

Ermias Belay, M.D.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

-----Original Message-----

From:

Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 10:15 AM

To:
rr26k@nih.gov; rrace@niaid.nih.gov; ebb8@CDC.GOV

Subject: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG

HUNTERS

Sunday, November 10, 2002 6:26 PM ......snip........end..............TSS
 
 
 
 
 http://www.tseandfoodsafety.org/activities/bse_conference_basel_april_02/2summar

 


SNIP...END...TSS

Chronic Wasting Disease and Potential Transmission to Humans

Ermias D. Belay,* Ryan A. Maddox,* Elizabeth S. Williams,? Michael W. Miller,? Pierluigi Gambetti,§ and Lawrence B. Schonberger*

*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; ?University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA; ?Colorado Division of Wildlife, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; and §Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Suggested citation for this article: Belay ED, Maddox RA, Williams ES, Miller MW, Gambetti P, Schonberger LB. Chronic wasting disease and potential transmission to humans. Emerg Infect Dis [serial on the Internet]. 2004 Jun [date cited]. Available from:
 
 http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm

 

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is endemic in a tri-corner area of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and new foci of CWD have been detected in other parts of the United States. Although detection in some areas may be related to increased surveillance, introduction of CWD due to translocation or natural migration of animals may account for some new foci of infection. Increasing spread of CWD has raised concerns about the potential for increasing human exposure to the CWD agent. The foodborne transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans indicates that the species barrier may not completely protect humans from animal prion diseases. Conversion of human prion protein by CWD-associated prions has been demonstrated in an in vitro cell-free experiment, but limited investigations have not identified strong evidence for CWD transmission to humans. More epidemiologic and laboratory studies are needed to monitor the possibility of such transmissions.

snip...full text ;
 
 http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm

 


Volume 12, Number 10-October 2006

Research

Human Prion Disease and Relative Risk Associated with Chronic Wasting Disease

Samantha MaWhinney,* W. John Pape,? Jeri E. Forster,* C. Alan Anderson,?§ Patrick Bosque,?¶ and Michael W. Miller#

*University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA; ?Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado, USA; ?University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado, USA; §Denver Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA; ¶Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA; and #Colorado Division of Wildlife, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

Suggested citation for this article

The transmission of the prion disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans raises concern about chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disease of deer and elk. In 7 Colorado counties with high CWD prevalence, 75% of state hunting licenses are issued locally, which suggests that residents consume most regionally harvested game. We used Colorado death certificate data from 1979 through 2001 to evaluate rates of death from the human prion disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The relative risk (RR) of CJD for CWD-endemic county residents was not significantly increased (RR 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-1.63), and the rate of CJD did not increase over time (5-year RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.73-1.16). In Colorado, human prion disease resulting from CWD exposure is rare or nonexistent. However, given uncertainties about the incubation period, exposure, and clinical presentation, the possibility that the CWD agent might cause human disease cannot be eliminated.

snip... full text ;
 
 http://0-www.cdc.gov.mill1.sjlibrary.org/ncidod/EID/vol12no10/06-0019.htm

 


full text ;
 
 http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2006_12_01_archive.html

 


Monday, July 06, 2009

Prion infectivity in fat of deer with Chronic Wasting Disease
 
 http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/prion-infectivity-in-fat-of-deer-with.html

 


CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE BLOG
 
 http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/

 


Monitoring the occurrence of emerging forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United States 2003 revisited 2009
 
 http://cjdusa.blogspot.com/2009/06/monitoring-occurrence-of-emerging-forms.html

 

Thursday, July 23, 2009

UW Hospital warning 53 patients about possible exposure to rare brain disease
 
 http://creutzfeldt-jakob-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/uw-hospital-warning-53-patients-about.html


 
 


Saturday, June 13, 2009
 

Monitoring the occurrence of emerging forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United States 2003 revisited 2009

http://cjdusa.blogspot.com/2009/06/monitoring-occurrence-of-emerging-forms.html
 
 
 
 
SEE THIS DAMNING VIDEO NOW AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BLOG BELOW ;
 
 
http://creutzfeldt-jakob-disease.blogspot.com/2009/07/usa-hiding-mad-cow-disease-victims-as.html

 
 
NOW, you have to make your own mind up, but at least you have the rest of the facts. ...
 
 
 
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518


also,
 
 

A. Aguzzi - Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) also needs to be addressed. Most

serious because of rapid horizontal spread and higher prevalence than BSE in

UK, up to 15% in some populations. Also may be a risk to humans - evidence

that it is not dangerous to humans is thin.
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